Wilkommen in Usbekistan

THE PRESS OF UZBEKISTAN: CONDITIONS AND PERSPECTIVES

One of the most important conditions of reforming and modernizing the country is the further development of mass media democratization and liberalization and security of freedom of speech and pluralism of opinions. Like in any democratic state, free and independent media in Uzbekistan come out as a significant civil society institution. Therefore the state policy of Uzbekistan in this sphere is aimed at providing for their deserved place in the country's political and spiritual life, securing social and legal protection of journalist activities, training specialists in journalism, the development of media market and the formation of a just competition medium on it.

The Uzbek media activities and the development of the country's media space make it possible to note that the process of liberalization in this field has passed onto the next level of its development. At present there is a solid legislative basis for the realization of freedom of speech and mass media as well as for a dynamic and consistent development of information sphere; inadmissibility of censorship has been secured along with requirements stipulating for a suspense of media activities only through a court decision; and rules of media registration have been simplified. A dozen of laws were adopted to regulate work of media structures such as the laws: On Mass Media, On Guarantees and Freedom of Access to Information, On Principles and Guarantees of Freedom of Information, On the Protection of Professional Activities of Journalists, On Copyright and Allied Rights, On Advertising, and others.

It should be noted that there are at present over 1,000 mass media units functioning in the country including about 700 newspapers, over 200 magazines, four news agencies, a number of TV and radio channels as well as Internet agencies and news services. The majority of them are non-state and private media units that are a major factor of civil society building and this shows that the role of representatives of the so-called "fourth power" in renovated society has considerably increased.